BIOS

David Bergman is the author or editor of over a dozen books. His latest volume of poetry is Heroic Measures (Ohio State, 1998). His latest book of criticism is The Violet Hour: The Violet Quill and the Making of Gay Culture (Columbia, 2004). He teaches at Towson University.
Poetry Reading at Chapters Books on April 7

David Bottoms was born in 1949 in Canton, Georgia. Robert Penn Warren selected Bottoms's first collection, Shooting Rats at the Bibb County Dump (1980), for the 1979 Walt Whitman Award. His most recent work includes Vagrant Grace (Copper Canyon, 1999), Armored Hearts: Selected and New Poems (1995) and the novel Easter Weekend (1990). His poems have appeared in many magazines, including The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, The Kenyon Review, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and The Southern Review. His many honors include the Levinson Prize, an Ingram-Merrill Award, an American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award, and a National Endowment for the the Arts Fellowship. A Professor of English at Georgia State University, David Bottoms lives in Atlanta.
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20

Sarah Browning co-edited DC Poets Against theWar: An Anthology (Argonne House Press, 2004) and has had recent poems published in The New York Quarterly, The Literary Review, and Eclipse. Her collection of poems was a finalist for the New Issues Poetry Prize and she is a recipient of the Quadrangle Poetry Award. She was founding director of Amherst Writers & Artists Institute, an organization providing creative writing workshops to low-income women and youth, and now works raising money for women playwrights and filmmakers at The Fund for Women Artists.
Poetry Reading at Grace Church on March 29

Linda Joy Burke is a performance poet and published writer residing in Maryland. She grew up in the Nation's capital during the 1960s, went to Mt. Vernon College in DC for poetry and Loyola College of Baltimore for not long enough. She's done a number of labor intensive jobs where she learned service and patience. She's been writing for over 40 years and reads everything she can get her hands on except horror, computer manuals, and most contemporary science fiction. She listens to PBS, watches a lot of documentary TV, and listens to everything in music from hip hop to classical, country to world beat--and she values silence. She says, "I believe there's always a little more room in the old brain for something new."
Poetry Reading at the Arts Club of Washington on May 25

Steven Lee Carson is an award-winning international lecturer, author, playwright, editor and Washington, DC radio and television commentator who has delivered addresses in The White House, The Kremlin, and over the Voice of America among other sites. He is currently or past Chairman of The White House Conference on Presidential Children, President of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, Inc., member of the Advisory Committee of the United States Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, and Board of Trustees for the Abraham Lincoln Institute, Lincoln Forum and Lincoln Group of Illinois.
Walking Tour of Congressional Cemetery on May 7

Grace Cavalieri is the author of thirteen books and chapbooks of poetry; her latest is a children's book, Little Line. Her play Quilting the Sun was recently presented at the Smithsonian Institution by its New York cast. Her twentieth play, Jennie & the JuJu Man, premiered in New York City in 2004. She has produced and hosted "The Poet and the Poem" on public radio for 27 years. The series is recorded at the Library of Congress for distribution via NPR satellite. She is active in small press publishing, writing reviews of books and theater, and teaching creative writing workshops throughout the country. Grace has won the Allen Ginsberg Award for Poetry, the PEN/Fiction Award, and the Silver Medal from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
Poetry Reading at Grace Church on March 29

Robert Aubry Davis is a native Washingtonian and an active member of the area's cultural community. Davis is the creator and host of "Millennium of Music," a program dedicated to music of the thousand years before Bach. The program is carried by over 100 public radio stations nationwide and can currently be heard on WETA 90.9 FM. He has also been host and moderator of WETA TV 26's Emmy Award-winning weekly arts discussion program, Around Town, for all of its 19 seasons.

Mark DeFoe is Chairman of the English Department at West Virginia Wesleyan College. He has published six chapbooks: Bringing Home Breakfast (Black Willow, 1983), Palmate (Pringle Tree Press, 1988), AIR (Green Towers Press, 1998), Aviary (Pringle Tree, 2001), The Green Chair (Pringle Tree, 2003), and Greatest Hits (Pudding House Press, 2004). He has received two artists' fellowships from the state of West Virginia.
Poetry Reading at Grace Church on March 29

Mark Doty's many books include Source, Firebird: A Memoir, and My Alexandria, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. Philip Levine writes that Doty is "a maker of big, risky, fearless poems in which ordinary human experience becomes music."
Walt Whitman Birthday Reading at the Folger Shakespeare Library on May 16

Robert L. Giron is the author of five collections of poetry: Impressions françaises [French Impressions], Wrestling with Wood, Recuerdos [Memories], Metamorphosis of the Serpent God, and Songs for the Spirit. His latest work is an English translation of noted Mexican novelist Jesús Gardea's posthumous poetry collection, Canciones para una sola cuerda/Songs for a Single String, which was one of three finalists in the Violet Crown Award for Literary Prose/Poetry, sponsored by Barnes & Noble and the Texas Writers' League in Austin, TX. He is a professor of English and creative writing at Montgomery College in Takoma Park, MD, and is the founder of Gival Press.
Poetry Reading at the Arts Club of Washington on May 25

Patricia Gray grew up in the Shenandoah Valley and has lived in Washington, DC for 20 years. Her MFA degree in poetry is from the University of Virginia. Since 1994, she has coordinated the Poetry at Noon program at the Library of Congress. Her book Rupture was recently published. Patricia has received artist fellowships in poetry from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. She lives and works on Capitol Hill and is fascinated not only with Whitman's work but also his life and times in the Nation's Capital.
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20
Poetry Reading at the Library of Congress on May 31

Michael Gushue is co-coordinator for the BAWA* Brookland Poetry Series, held the first Wednesday of every month. His poetry has been published in American Letters and Commentary, the Indiana Review, the Cream City Review, and Redivider, and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2003. He works in international development and lives in DC with his wife and five children.
Whitman's Children Poetry Reading at the Brookland Visitor's Center on May 4

Clarinda Harriss teaches poetry and creative writing in the English Department at Towson University. Her latest book publications are When Divas Dance, with Chezia Thompson Cager and Kendra Kopelke (Maisonneuve Press, 2004), and a full collection of poems, Air Travel (Half Moon Editions, 2005). Recently she took first place in Pagitica's poetry competition and second place in Carve Magazine's annual Raymond Carver fiction competition. She directs BrickHouse Books, Inc., Maryland's oldest continuously publishing literary press, and works with prison writers.
Poetry Reading at the Arts Club of Washington on May 25

Craig Howell is a native Washingtonian with a lifelong passion for all things Civil War. He started giving tours of nearby Civil War battlefields nearly 20 years ago and turned professional in 1994, following his retirement as an economist with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. As a licensed D.C. Tour Guide, he has conducted tours of battlefields and Civil War Washington for numerous groups and organizations, and has taken members of the Washington Friends of Walt Whitman to many places where Walt's brother George fought, including Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Petersburg. An avid hiker, Craig is also the current Coordinator of the Adventuring outdoors group and serves as President of the Chrysalis Arts & Culture Group of Washington.
Walking Tour of Whitman's Washington on April 17

Saundra Rose Maley is an adjunct assistant professor in the English Department, George Washington University. She's had poems in Dryad, Calvert Review, Ethos, Sybil-Child, The Mill and D.C. Perspectives. She is the author of Solitary Apprenticeship: James Wright and German Poetry (Mellen Press) and with Francis A. Burkle-Young, The Art of the Footnote and The Research Guide for the Digital Age (both published by the University Press of America). In April 2005, Farrar Straus Giroux will publish A Wild Perfection: Selected Letters of James Wright, which Maley co-edited with Anne Wright.
Co-Editor of The Whitman Issue of Beltway: A Poetry Quarterly
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20

David McAleavey is the Director of the Creative Writing Program in the English Department at George Washington University, where he teaches creative writing and American and English literature, especially poetry. He's had four books of poems published, a chapbook (David McAleavey: Greatest Hits 1971-2000, Pudding House Publications, 2001), and his newest book, Huge Haiku, is forthcoming from Chax Press.
Host of the 1855 Leaves of Grass Marathon Reading on April 16
Poetry Reading at the Arts Club of Washington on May 25

Judith McCombs is the author of two books and numerous articles on Margaret Atwood, and several books of poetry, most recently Against Nature: Wilderness Poems (Dustbooks), and Territories, Here & Elsewhere (Mayapple). The Habit of Fire: Poems Selected & New is forthcoming in 2005 from The Word Works, Inc. Individual poems of hers have appeared in Calyx, Red Cedar Review, Nimrod, Poetry, Poetry Northwest, and River Styx. She teaches at the Writer's Center in Bethesda, MD, and coordinates a poetry reading series at Kensington Row Bookshop.
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20

Mark W. Meinke, founder and chair of the Rainbow History Project, has authored a number of brochures and papers on aspects of Washington, DC's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered history.  All of these are available online at Rainbow History's website: www.rainbowhistory.org.  In his day job, Meinke serves as director of Finance and Administration of a cancer patient support organization, The Wellness Community.
Co-author, "Walt Whitman: Gay DC Walking Tours"

Martin G. Murray is the founder of the Washington Friends of Walt Whitman, a fellowship of enthusiasts in the nation's capitol. His work on Whitman has been published in the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, The Classroom Electric: Dickinson, Whitman and American Culture, the Yale University Library Gazette, Washington History, Walt Whitman: An Encyclopedia, and the forthcoming A Companion to Walt Whitman. When not researching Whitman, Murray works as an economist for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
Walking Tour of Whitman's Washington on April 17
Walking Tour of Congressional Cemetery on May 7
Co-author, "Walt Whitman: Gay DC Walking Tours"

Neil Richardson is an organizational and community transformation specialist, and a practitioner of Integrative meditation. He works as a Senior Associate with Communities of the Future.
Whitman Guided Meditation on April 16

Kim Roberts is the editor of Beltway: An On-Line Poetry Quarterly. The author of a book of poetry,The Wishbone Galaxy, individual poems of hers are also included in numerous anthologies, such as American Poetry: The Next Generation (Carnegie Mellon University Press), Hungry As We Are (Washington Writers Publishing House), and The First Yes: Poems About Communicating (Dryad Press). She has been awarded writer's residency grants from the Wurlitzer Foundation, Mesa Refuge, the Ucross Foundation, New York Mills Arts Retreat, I-Park, the Hidden River Arts Center, the Ragdale Foundation, the Millay Colony, Blue Mountain Center, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. This April, she will be a presenter at the "Whitman and Place" conference at Rutgers University.
Co-Editor of The Whitman Issue of Beltway: A Poetry Quarterly
Co-author, "Walt Whitman: Gay DC Walking Tours"
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20

Richard Sharp works full-time at the Library of Congress, and also teaches literature part-time at a variety of universities in the area: George Washington, Howard, Montgomery College, and currently, at Catholic University and UDC. He teaches American literature primarily as the American Renaissance is his area of specialization; his dissertation is titled The Poet's Witness: A Comparative Study of the Civil War Poetry of Walt Whitman and Herman Melville. He has published several chapters as articles. He also published a chapbook, Regenesis: Mass for the Poor, in 1976. He is a member of DC Poets Against the War and the Washington Friends of Walt Whitman. He calls himself a "certified Whitmaniac."
Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20

Myra Sklarew, former president of the artist community Yaddo and currently professor of literature at American University, is the author of three chapbooks and six full-length collections of poetry, most recently Lithuania: New & Selected Poems and The Witness Trees. She is also the author of a collection of short fiction, Like a Field Riddled by Ants, and a collection of essays, Over the Rooftops of Time, and is at work on a nonfiction study, Holocaust and the Construction of Memory. Her poetry has been recorded for the Contemporary Poets' Archives of the Library of Congress.
Poetry Reading at Chapters Books on April 7

Sherwood Smith is Emeritus Faculty at the City University of New York and a member of the Executive Committee of the Washington Association of Oldest Inhabitants.
"Taking Poetry to the Street: A DC Public Library Celebration of Poetry" on Saturday, April 23

Hilary Tham grew up in Malaysia, graduated from the University of Malaya with a B.A. in Literature, and moved to the USA upon marriage to an American Peace Corps volunteer. The author of nine books of poetry and a memoir, Editor-in-Chief for The Word Works, Inc., and poetry editor for the Potomac Review, she received a grant for Literary Excellence from the Virginia Commission for the Arts and has been featured on NPR and Maryland Public Television.
Poetry Reading at Grace Church on March 29

Dan Vera was born in south Texas and lived in Colorado, Washington State, and Chicago before moving to the Brookland neighborhood of Washington DC. When Dan was in his early twenties Pablo Neruda whispered in his ear and his world went Technicolor. Consequently he has had a hard time seeing in black and white ever since. The Tejano Cubano, radical faerie poet is managing editor and creative director of White Crane Journal and a member of the Triangle Artists' Group. His poetry has been featured on Pacifica Peace Watch, in White Crane Journal, Wesley Lake, the Raddish, Red Wheelbarrow, and the collections Shaping Sanctuary and Poets Against the War: An Anthology. He helped start Brookland Area Writers & Artists and co-coordinates the Brookland Poetry Series.
Whitman's Children Poetry Reading at the Brookland Visitor's Center on May 4

Anne Waldman is a poet, performer, and cultural activist who co-founded with Allen Ginsberg the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa Institute. She is the author of over of over 30 books, including, most recently, Structure of the World Compared to a Bubble, In the Room of Never Grieve: New and Selected Poems, and Civil Disobedience: Poetics and Politics in Action, which she co-edited with Lisa Birman.
Walt Whitman Birthday Reading at the Folger Shakespeare Library on May 16

Rosemary Winslow lives and works in DC (on the same street where Whitman lived for a time), with her husband John, a visual artist. Her work has appeared in 32 Poems, Poet Lore, The Southern Review, Crux, and other journals. She has received the Larry Neal Award for Poetry twice and Writer's Fellowships from the DC Commission for the Arts and The Vermont Studio Center. She teaches literature and writing at The Catholic University of America, specializing in American poetry from 1850 to the present. Her articles on Whitman have included the influence of Egyptology on his work, and Whitman's prosodic practice and influence on the Modernists.
Poetry Reading at Chapters Books on April 7
Co-Host of the 1855 Leaves of Grass Marathon Reading on April 16
Host of the Poetry Reading at Catholic University on April 20